controversy

The Abolition of Man

  • Sep 30, 2015
  • David Naugle
  • 0 Comments

In the first line of his noted book The Abolition of Man, C. S. Lewis wrote: “I doubt whether we are sufficiently attentive to the importance of elementary text-books.” Likewise, I doubt whether we are sufficiently attentive to the importance of the so-called “new science of the moral sense” that …

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Gadgets

  • Feb 16, 2014
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

Gadgets. They are here to stay. Human history is threaded with invention and innovation, helping us with our many inefficiencies. It’s easy to believe in Friedrich Nietzsche’s Superman which was popularized further by playwright George Bernard Shaw, novelist H.G. Wells and other in the early part of the 20th century. …

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Time is Not Immortal

  • Oct 29, 2013
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

The readings for October 28 and 29 in A Year with C.S. Lewis are unsettling. They are excerpts from Miracles in the subject of prayer. The central questions is why do we pray? Do we pray because God is likely to change his will? Do we pray because if we …

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Lewis and His Dates

  • Mar 18, 2013
  • Devin Brown
  • 0 Comments

C. S. Lewis opens chapter four of his autobiography, Surprised by Joy, with this statement:  “In January, 1911, just turned thirteen, I set out with my brother to Wyvern, he for the College and I for a preparatory school …” (56). However, since we know Lewis was born on November …

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New Finds about Lewis's Conversion

  • Feb 19, 2013
  • Andrew Lazo
  • 0 Comments

It all began with an overheard conversation. Last summer, at the Marion E. Wade Center doing research for a book project on Till We Have Faces, I eavesdropped a discussion concerning an unpublished manuscript by C. S. Lewis that had been labeled as an early version of Surprised by Joy. …

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The Lion, the Witch and the Physicist

  • Jul 28, 2012
  • Charlie W. Starr
  • 1 Comment

I am a C. S. Lewis fanatic. I’ve read all his works, been to his home in England, and even written a book about one of his stories. For an expert, it can be humbling when an amateur points out something you’ve missed. The book was The Lion, the Witch …

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Lewis's First and Final Short Story

  • Jun 07, 2012
  • Devin Brown
  • 0 Comments

A joint conference of The Frances White Ewbank Colloquium on C. S. Lewis and Friends and the C. S. Lewis and the Inklings Society was held recently at Taylor University. At one of the plenary sessions a new Lewis-related work was featured and given its official launch. “Light”: C. S. …

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C. S. Lewis and the Deity of Jesus

  • May 07, 2012
  • Joel Heck
  • 7 Comments

Why does Lewis so vehemently reject the view that treats Jesus as a historical rather than a divine figure? Why does he find the notion of some who regard Jesus merely as a great moral teacher to be absurd? Why does he assert that “If Christianity only means one more …

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A Review of The Narnia Code

  • Jan 10, 2011
  • Charlie W. Starr
  • 3 Comments

Scholars are required to write lengthy, heavily footnoted tomes, carefully and logically presented, with not even the slightest minutiae left uncovered. In the case of Michael Ward’s first book, Planet Narnia, the task was made more difficult by his need to prove a radical and controversial claim: that there is …

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How C. S. Lewis “Prefutes” Stephen Hawking

  • Sep 23, 2010
  • David C. Downing
  • 6 Comments

Last summer Sarah Palin accidentally coined the word refudiate, apparently an amalgam of “refute” and “repudiate.” I would like to propose a kindred word, prefute, which means to neutralize someone’s arguments before they have even been proposed. In a recent issue of the Wall Street Journal (Sept. 10, 2010), physicists …

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