Space Trilogy

The Devils in Our World

  • Jul 16, 2016
  • David Naugle
  • 0 Comments

C. S. Lewis titled That Hideous Strength after a line in a poem by Sir David Lyndsay called “Ane Dialog” (1555) in which Lyndsay was describing the biblical Tower of Babel (Genesis 11: 1-9): “The shadow of that hideous strength, Six miles and more it is of length.”

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Strange Help from Father Christmas

  • Nov 29, 2015
  • Devin Brown
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At the start of Prince Caspian as the four Pevensie children hunt through the dust-covered treasure chamber deep in the ruins of what was once Cair Paravel, Susan finds her bow and arrows magically preserved, but the enchanted horn that will always bring help is nowhere to be seen. Susan …

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Apocalyptic Themes in "That Hideous Strength"

  • Oct 31, 2014
  • Marisa White
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There’s no escaping the apocalypse. For all of us, there will be some “end of the world” experience: whether or not we live to see the cosmic end of all things, everyone must face the inevitable close of our earthly lives and our journeys into the beyond. This inescapable human …

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That Hideous Strength: Marriage, Merlin, and Mayhem

  • Apr 19, 2012
  • David C. Downing
  • 1 Comment

That Hideous Strength, the third book of the Ransom trilogy, is one of Lewis’s best-loved stories—and also one of his most fiercely criticized. It is a big book, more than twice as long as the two earlier books of the trilogy combined. Admirers of the story find there a literary …

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Perelandra: Re-awakening the Spiritual Imagination

  • Apr 17, 2012
  • David C. Downing
  • 3 Comments

Perelandra is the first book I read by C. S. Lewis, and the encounter couldn’t have come at a more opportune time. I was a freshman in college, and I was wrestling mightily with all the usual questions so many Christians ponder: how could a good God create a world …

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Smuggling Theology: Lewis’s Cosmic Trilogy

  • Apr 04, 2012
  • Bruce L. Edwards
  • 3 Comments

Sister Penelope, a winsome, lifelong correspondent of C. S. Lewis, had written to him about the provenance of his first space travel adventure, Out of the Silent Planet, a volume remarkably full of theological insight. He replied whimsically: “Any amount of theology can now be smuggled into people’s minds under …

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Out of the Silent Planet: Cosmic Voyage as Spiritual Pilgrimage

  • Apr 03, 2012
  • David C. Downing
  • 3 Comments

Having already earned a reputation as a formidable literary scholar, C. S. Lewis scandalized his fellow Oxford dons in 1938 when he published a fantasy novel, Out of the Silent Planet. They would have been even more alarmed if they had noticed that he was writing what he called “theologized …

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Mighty Ones, Who Do His Bidding

  • Jun 18, 2011
  • Janice B. Brown
  • 0 Comments

Angels and devils are creatures of myth in the broadest sense, but they are also part of the true myth that is Christianity. Of devils, Lewis said that there are two equally serious errors: disbelief in them and an “excessive and unhealthy interest in them” (Preface to The Screwtape Letters). …

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Journeys to the Underworld in the Aeneid and The Silver Chair

  • Apr 27, 2011
  • David C. Downing
  • 2 Comments

One of the characters in Virgil’s Aeneid is named Polydorus, which means “many-gifted.” That epithet might apply just as well to C. S. Lewis. Visitors to this site already know Lewis as the creator of Narnia, as well as a distinguished literary critic, an influential Christian writer, and a gifted …

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Through the Wardrobe

  • Jan 22, 2011
  • Will Vaus
  • 2 Comments

The back cover of Through the Wardrobe (2010, by Herbie Brennan) invites the reader to: “Step through the wardrobe and into the imaginations of 16 friends of Aslan as they explore Narnia—from The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe to The Last Battle, from the heart of Caspian’s kingdom to …

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