George MacDonald

Perelandra: Re-awakening the Spiritual Imagination

  • Apr 17, 2012
  • David C. Downing
  • 3 Comments

Perelandra is the first book I read by C. S. Lewis, and the encounter couldn’t have come at a more opportune time. I was a freshman in college, and I was wrestling mightily with all the usual questions so many Christians ponder: how could a good God create a world …

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The Quality of Heaven

  • Nov 21, 2011
  • Uncategorized
  • 5 Comments

Here’s a question for you from The Great Divorce. Later in the story, George MacDonald meets up with the narrator and becomes the guide into Heave. He says that, “all that are in hell, choose it.” Do you agree with that? Further, he defines two different people, “those who say to …

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Why Read Old Books: History and Its Relevance

  • Jul 02, 2010
  • Dan Hamilton
  • 2 Comments

An Introduction is a signpost – pointing not to itself but to the pages that follow. While “On the Reading of Old Books” is usually reprinted (and presented) as a stand-alone essay by Lewis, it is actually the introduction to a book written by someone else: “The Incarnation of the …

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Heaven and Hell as Idea and Image in C. S. Lewis

  • May 07, 2010
  • Peter J. Schakel
  • 0 Comments

C. S. Lewis was deeply interested in heaven. In his nonfiction prose he frequently discussed the nature of heaven (and, less frequently, the nature of hell) and explained how to take part in it. In his works of fiction he created several striking descriptions of what heaven (and, in less …

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Echoes of Eden

  • Nov 10, 2009
  • Jerram Barrs
  • 3 Comments

by Jerram Barrs I want to begin by explaining why I chose this title. First, we go back all the way to Lewis’ childhood. From a very early age Lewis had loved fairy stories, legends and myths. He delighted particularly in the myths of the Norsemen – the sagas of …

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New Starts: Looking at the World Rightly

  • Oct 23, 2009
  • Devin Brown
  • 0 Comments

Near the end of chapter seven of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, the narrator steps in to tell us about the change that has occurred in the formerly obnoxious Eustace. It would be nice, and fairly nearly true, to say that “from that time forth Eustace was a different …

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C.S. Lewis Sat Here

  • Aug 20, 2009
  • Will Vaus
  • 0 Comments

The first time I visited Oxford, in 1982, the porter at Magdalen College didn’t even recognize the name— C. S. Lewis. I had asked him if he could give me directions to Lewis’s former home in Headington Quarry. Obviously he could not and did not. Things have changed a lot …

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Running Down Heaven and Hell

  • Nov 24, 2008
  • Wayne Martindale
  • 4 Comments

C.S. Lewis by profession was an Oxford don for 30 years and then another six at Cambridge. He was born in Ireland and from those boarding school days until the end of his life he lived in England. He is a man who is sometimes accused of having led a …

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How C. S. Lewis Expands Our View of God

  • Sep 21, 2008
  • Peter J. Schakel
  • 0 Comments

Peter Schakel’s new book, Is Your Lord Large Enough? How C. S. Lewis Expands Our View of God (InterVarsity Press, 2008), is about image. “We can know people only through mental images,” he says in the opening pages. Is this more true about a God who we haven’t seen than …

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