Digitized Lewis

oldbooks
  • Mar 23, 2015
  • William O'Flaherty
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C.S. Lewis wrote many books in a wide variety of subjects. Sadly, some people are only familiar with his material defending the Christian faith and others focus on his Narnia stories or just the fact that he wrote content related to his profession. What if you wanted to collect all his titles and have the ability to easily browse through all the works and even have the capacity to search them?

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The Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis eBooks, Volume 1 & 2: $1.99 Until March 30th

March-SiteBanner
  • Mar 19, 2015
  • HarperOne
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The Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis, Volume I offers an inside perspective to Lewis’s thinking during his formative years. Walter Hooper’s insightful notes and biographical appendix of all the correspondents make this an irreplaceable reference for those curious about the life and work of one of the most creative minds of the modern era.
At age sixteen, Lewis begins writing to Arthur Greeves, a boy his age in Belfast who later becomes one of his most treasured friends. Their correspondence would continue over the next fifty years. In his letters to Arthur, Lewis admits that he has abandoned the Christian faith. “I believe in no religion,” he says. “There is absolutely no proof for any of them.”

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Daylight Saving

lewissmoke
  • Mar 07, 2015
  • Zach Kincaid
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As we think of gardens in the coming days of spring, consider the garden where Jesus prayed so hard he sweat blood compared to our present trials. “We are not asked to go anywhere where he has not gone before us,” writes Lewis in a letter to Mrs. Jessup in Nov. 1952. “I have had enough experiences of the crises of family life, the terrors, the despondencies, hopes deferred, and wearinesses. …Take it hour by hour, don’t add the past & the future to the present load more than you can help.”

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Iron Nerves

ironcross
  • Mar 04, 2015
  • Zach Kincaid
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In a letter on Feb 23, 1947, Lewis makes some observations about Jesus that are worth mentioning, especially during this season of Lent. Here’s what he says:

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Take Up C. S. Lewis for Lent

  • Feb 26, 2015
  • HarperOne
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With the season of Lent upon us, we have the opportunity to reflect on Lewis’s wisdom regarding the three traditional Lenten disciplines of fasting, prayer and almsgiving – and what prompts us to undertake these obligations in the first place.
Why do we fast during Lent? We assume it ought to be a trial, something to be endured, so we ‘give up’ things we like, things we enjoy. Chocolate is the favourite choice; alcohol another. But these things that we desire, and for which during Lent we crave and wrestle with ourselves to resist, are not only things we enjoy, but also, more often than not, things we consider to be our vices. So we begin to equate enjoyment with sin. Desire itself becomes something to be avoided. We teach ourselves that, if we feel “want” for something, if we enjoy it, it must be bad for us, and therefore God would prefer us to …

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The “Die-er” of the Universe

corn
  • Feb 24, 2015
  • Zach Kincaid
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The idea that Christ is the corn king – the fulfillment of the myths that thread through history – rings loud and often in Lewis’s work. In Miracles Lewis presents the Incarnation as the greatest of all the signs of God.

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The Allegory of Love eBook Now $2.99 Until February 23rd

The Allegory of Love eBook
  • Feb 19, 2015
  • HarperOne
  • 0 Comments

The Allegory of Love is a delightful and influential exploration of the allegorical treatment of love in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, tracing the development of the idea of courtly love and its impact on today’s ideas about love. The book is also ornamented with quotations from poems in many languages, from such poets as Geoffrey Chaucer, John Gower, and Thomas Usk.

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Have You Ever Been In Love?

  • Feb 16, 2015
  • HarperOne
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Have you ever been in love?
I can still remember the first time: the excitement; the skip in the heart when your eyes catch sight of the Beloved, the deep sense of contentment at being constantly in each other’s company; the belief that you would do anything – give even your life – for this other person. The corrective to these emotions is an underlying insecurity, manifested in the agonising wait for an email or phonecall; the urgent, grieving pain of jealousy in the chest. Lewis would call this ‘Need-love’, which, with its opposite number ‘Gift-love’, he illustrates thus: ‘Need-love says of a woman “I cannot live without her”; Gift-love longs to give her happiness, comfort, protection.’

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To Love Is To Be Vulnerable

lewis-and-joy
  • Feb 12, 2015
  • HarperOne
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Happy Valentine’s Day. “To love at all is to be vulnerable,” says C.S. Lewis in the “The Four Loves”. “Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket, safe, dark, motionless, airless, it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable.”

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Friendship (part 1)

friend
  • Feb 01, 2015
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

“But very few modern people think Friendship a love of comparable value [to Eros] or even a love at all,” says Lewis in “The Four Loves.”

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