Spiritual Sins Are Worse

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  • Jun 28, 2015
  • Janice B. Brown
  • 0 Comments

Lewis ends the chapter “Sexual Morality” with a remarkable assertion: “…a cold self-righteous prig who goes regularly to church may be far nearer to hell than a prostitute” (p. 95). Why does Lewis consider spiritual sins to be worse than sins of the flesh? What is Lewis’s view of the proper role of sexuality, pleasure, and chastity for Christians?

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The C. S. Lewis Classics As You’ve Never Seen Them

The C. S. Lewis Classics As You've Never Seen Them
  • Jun 24, 2015
  • HarperOne
  • 0 Comments

This vital collection of nine works by one of the greatest Christian literary figures of the twentieth century is now beautifully repackaged with full-color illustrated covers, rendering each one a coveted and vibrant addition to any Lewis fan’s bookshelf. These eye-catching covers are also a welcomed invitation for new readers to fall in love with the works of C. S. Lewis.

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Dispelling Myths about C. S. Lewis

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  • Jun 13, 2015
  • Jerry Root
  • 4 Comments

C. S. Lewis once wrote an essay titled, The Funeral of a Great Myth, in it he eulogizes the religion of evolutionism. In the same spirit, I have often thought it would be good to bury a host of myths about C. S. Lewis as well.

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Who Is Interfering?

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  • May 27, 2015
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

When we think of religion we might turn to a set of rules that, if followed, will produce a sense of order and satisfaction. We may also view religion as an aim to experience a particular feeling or emotion through a variety of means. But Christianity is not chiefly about rules nor about emotion; it’s about a certain death that brings us into life.

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Summer Reading

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  • May 17, 2015
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

Do you have your summer reading list put together? We certainly encourage you to read Lewis in whatever format you choose. But you might also want to read a book that was in Lewis’s library–a book that influenced him. 

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The Pilgrim’s Regress eBook- Now $1.99 Until May 25th

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  • May 14, 2015
  • HarperOne
  • 0 Comments

Modeled after John Bunyan’s famous Pilgrim’s Progress, C. S. Lewis’s Pilgrim’s Regress represents a number of firsts for Lewis—the first book he wrote after his conversion to Christianity, his first book of fiction, and the first book he published under his own name. It is, in a sense, the record of Lewis’s own search for meaning and spiritual satisfaction—a search that eventually led him to Christianity. Lewis’s allegory remains a witty satire on cultural fads, a vivid account of spiritual dangers, and an illuminating tale for generations of pilgrims old and new.

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Tom-Foolery

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  • Apr 21, 2015
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

“I know that many wiser and better Christians than I in these days do not like to mention Heaven and hell even in a pulpit,” says Lewis (The Weight of Glory). He goes on to say that nearly all the references in the New Testament about both destinations come from Jesus himself, and, “If we do not believe them, our presence in this church is great tom-foolery. If we do, we must sometimes overcome our spiritual prudery and mention them.”

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Resurrection Involves Reversal

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  • Apr 06, 2015
  • Zach Kincaid
  • 0 Comments

Resurrection is a subject that is central to the Christian narrative. Lewis addresses the idea of resurrection in his stories (Aslan and Eustace come to mind, for example), in his theological works, and in his letters. Here, I want to point out several occasions where Lewis discusses resurrection with hopes that his take on the subject might better refine ours as we head into the Easter season (a seven week celebration that just began, prior to Pentecost).

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C. S. Lewis and the Apt Metaphor

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  • Charlie W. Starr
  • 0 Comments

C. S. Lewis once wrote an essay on apologetics in which he said there are two things Christians in the Modern age must do in defending the faith. The first of these makes immediate sense to us: we must defend the supernatural elements of the Bible. The second, however, seems less relevant to apologetics. Lewis said we must show people the difference between thinking and imagining.

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